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Skills in the future of work

Published on 29/10/2018 in Inspire

Skills in the future of work

Jobs are disappearing and changing, but new skills are needed everywhere. Employees will also need to continuously improve upon those skills. How does a company best tackle this situation?

Our labor market will change not only due to the impact of technology, but also because society is changing,” Jan Van Acoleyen states. That is precisely why it is important, as an employee, to be open and receptive to this evolution. Digitalization calls for candidate profiles that were not needed in the past, such as in the context of security or the changes in the privacy laws.

“At the same time, a wide debate is taking place,” says Van Acoleyen. “Data are central to this. After all, these data are the basis of the new solutions and services. That calls for new skills in data architecture, data analysis, etc.”

Not just jobs are changing, but also the way we work. Read here how company leaders best handle this situation.

Work and flexibility

Adapt skills

The importance of digital interaction is increasing in the digital world. “Companies establish a digital relationship with the consumer,” says Van Acoleyen. “The digital aspect pervades everything. Including field service technicians, or think, for instance, of areas like security or privacy laws.” Specific skills are needed for this, which employees need to hone constantly throughout their careers.

The future calls for more than just digital skills. Digitalization itself means that the difference can be made partly through talents in the field of communication, collaboration and creativity.

Jan Van Acoleyen, Chief HR Officer with Proximus.

“We’re doing the same thing at Proximus, too. As an employer, we see it as our responsibility to invest in these new skills along with our staff.” In practical terms, Proximus is focusing on areas such as security, data analytics and digital marketing. The Proximus Corporate University now offers various intensive courses. Some of these involve staff following a training course one day a week for a fairly long period. “We look at what skills we will need in five or ten years’ time and build courses around that.

We do that, among other things, with so-called learning deals, where experts train one another. The future calls for more than just digital skills. Digitalization itself means that the difference can be made partly through talents in the field of communication, collaboration and creativity.”

With mixed teams

“The big question is how, in the digital context, we can offer the customer a better service,” says Van Acoleyen. “Behind the scenes, we do that by working beyond the boundaries of traditional departments. Employees are less tied to organizational structures and are given the chance to work with their colleagues differently.” Proximus is breaking the traditional mold. “In the past, first the technical development of a product took place, then came a marketing plan and the sales followed that. Today we work with transversal teams, so that development, marketing, selling and services are in close contact with one another.”

Jan Van Acoleyen is Chief HR Officer with Proximus since 2016.

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